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Archive for March 8th, 2010

DorobekINSIDER: The Federal News Radio Book Club book announcement: Drive by Daniel H. Pink

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It has been months since the last meeting of the Federal News Radio Book Club. Well, it’s back — and with a book that I think will really get you to think. The book is titled Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink. The book is a fascinating analysis of what gets us actually carry out actions. More in just a moment, but first…

The details:
When: Friday, April 2 at 3p ET
Where: On Federal News Radio 1500 AM’s Daily Debrief with Chris Dorobek and Amy Morris and on FederalNewsRadio.com
The book: Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink. Amy and I will be there with Pink — and I’m working on some special guests to join the discussion.

Before I get to some details of the book, a reminder on the Federal News Radio Book Club:

This is something akin to the Oprah book club. You don’t have to be anywhere — we’ll hold the book club “meeting” right on the air on Federal News Radio 1500 AM’s Daily Debrief with Chris Dorobek and Amy Morris. In addition to the author, Daniel Pink, we will also have some experts in the government world so we can discuss how it touches how this market works. We invite your thoughts, questions and observations on the book — before, during and after.

The book Drive is about what motivates people. And I thought it was particularly intriguing given where the government market is with a relatively antiquated pay system. And I decided that this book was particularly relevant based on two significant developments in the past year:

First, the Office of Personnel Management is looking at revamping the government’s general schedule system, OPM Director John Berry has said.
Second, the failure of the Defense Department’s National Security Personnel System, a pay-for-performance system. I have been fascinated by NSPS because, it seemed to me, it offered some real learning opportunities for the federal government.

And that brings us to the book — Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink.

The crux of the argument in this book is that pay-for-performance systems simply don’t work all that well. It is essentially a carrot-and-stick approach, and there is ample evidence that the carrot-and-stick is actually ade-motivator. A caveat: These are for information age jobs. And he argues that there are better ways to motivate people.

Here is Pink’s synopsis from his Web site:

Most of us believe that the best way to motivate ourselves and others is with external rewards like money—the carrot-and-stick approach. That’s a mistake, Daniel H. Pink says in, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, his provocative and persuasive new book. The secret to high performance and satisfaction—at work, at school, and at home—is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.

Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does—and how that affects every aspect of life. He demonstrates that while carrots and sticks worked successfully in the twentieth century, that’s precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today’s challenges. In Drive, he examines the three elements of true motivation—autonomy, mastery, and purpose—and offers smart and surprising techniques for putting these into action. Along the way, he takes us to companies that are enlisting new approaches to motivation and introduces us to the scientists and entrepreneurs who are pointing a bold way forward.

Pink is the author of A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future, which I also found fascinating. But this book seems particularly well timed.

So… I hope you’ll pick up the book and join in the conversation. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the book.

Previous Federal News Radio Book Club “meetings”:

* The SPEED of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything by Stephen M.R. Covey. Read more and find a link to the book club session here.
* What Would Google Do? by Jeff Jarvis. Read more and find a link to the book club session here.
* Grown Up Digital: How the Net Generation is Changing Your World by Don Tapscott. Read more and find a link to the book club session here.
* Fired Up or Burned Out: How to reignite your team’s passion, creativity, and productivity by Michael Lee Stallard. Read more and hear the book club meeting here.* Payback: Reaping the Rewards of Innovation by James P. Andrew, Harold L. Sirkin, and John Butman. Read more and hear the book club “meeting” with Andrew and Federal CTO Aneesh Chopra find a link to the book club session here.

DorobekINSIDER: Kronopolus named GSA’s assistant administrator; Lantier takes acting deputy procurement role

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The shuffling of the senior seats at the General Services Administration continues. Last week, the DorobekINSIDER told you that Tony Costa was named GSA’s associate administrator. This morning, GSA Administrator Martha Johnson announced that Cathy Kronopolus will be the GSA assistant administrator. Kronopolus has been serving as the acting chief of staff.

As acting administrator, Johnson said that Kronopolus will “play a day-to-day role of managing the front office agenda, mentor and coach executives, sort resources (people, time, knowledge) to support my primary goals, and build optimism and a culture of collaboration across leadership and explicitly modeled in my office.”

Meanwhile, Michael Robertson, GSA’s chief procurement officer, has named Rod Lantier as GSA’s acting deputy associate administrator for acquisition policy and the acting senior procurement executive. David Drabkin, of course, starts at Northrop Grumman today.

UPDATE: GSA officials tell the DorobekINSIDER that Steve Leeds, GSA’s Senior Counselor to the Administrator, is acting Chief of Staff while we move toward filling the role with a permanent Chief of Staff. That being said, there now is no GSA chief of staff — not even an acting chief of staff. Given that Johnson served as chief of staff under former GSA Administrator David Barrum, she is keenly aware of the import role that post can play in the success of the administrator — and the agency. So stay tuned.

Here is the note from Johnson sent to staff about the Kronopolus post:

Dear GSA:

Today, I am happy to announce that I have asked Cathy Kronopolus, who has been acting in the Chief of Staff and Senior Advisor roles, to remain in my office as an Assistant Administrator.

In this position, Cathy will play a day-to-day role of managing the front office agenda, mentor and coach executives, sort resources (people, time, knowledge) to support my primary goals, and build optimism and a culture of collaboration across leadership and explicitly modeled in my office.

Together, Cathy and I will create a vibrant and rejuvenated leadership cadre, organizational alignment so that GSA is “at one” with its declared strategic plan, an innovative spirit, and an ever higher level of performance supported in part by the progressive use of collaborative technologies.

I particularly appreciate the history and knowledge that Cathy brings, including her time in the Public Buildings Service, her experience working in regions and also at customer agencies. I always applaud leaders like Cathy who have personally demonstrated the willingness and interest to change and absorb new roles and challenges.

Join me in congratulating Cathy in her new role as Assistant Administrator.

Martha

Written by cdorobek

March 8, 2010 at 12:26 PM

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